February 26, 2014
"Are you alive or not?
Is there nothing in your head?"

— T.S. Eliot, from The Waste Land (via violentwavesofemotion)

(via dendroica)

February 9, 2014
99 legal sites to download literature

bethjpalik:

bookgeekconfessions:

The Classics

Browse works by Mark Twain, Joseph Conrad and other famous authors here.

  1. Classic Bookshelf: This site has put classic novels online, from Charles Dickens to Charlotte Bronte.
  2. The Online Books Page: The University of Pennsylvania hosts this book search and database.
  3. Project Gutenberg: This famous site has over 27,000 free books online.
  4. Page by Page Books: Find books by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and H.G. Wells, as well as speeches from George W. Bush on this site.
  5. Classic Book Library: Genres here include historical fiction, history, science fiction, mystery, romance and children’s literature, but they’re all classics.
  6. Classic Reader: Here you can read Shakespeare, young adult fiction and more.
  7. Read Print: From George Orwell to Alexandre Dumas to George Eliot to Charles Darwin, this online library is stocked with the best classics.
  8. Planet eBook: Download free classic literature titles here, from Dostoevsky to D.H. Lawrence to Joseph Conrad.
  9. The Spectator Project: Montclair State University’s project features full-text, online versions of The Spectator and The Tatler.
  10. Bibliomania: This site has more than 2,000 classic texts, plus study guides and reference books.
  11. Online Library of Literature: Find full and unabridged texts of classic literature, including the Bronte sisters, Mark Twain and more.
  12. Bartleby: Bartleby has much more than just the classics, but its collection of anthologies and other important novels made it famous.
  13. Fiction.us: Fiction.us has a huge selection of novels, including works by Lewis Carroll, Willa Cather, Sherwood Anderson, Flaubert, George Eliot, F. Scott Fitzgerald and others.
  14. Free Classic Literature: Find British authors like Shakespeare and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, plus other authors like Jules Verne, Mark Twain, and more.

Textbooks

If you don’t absolutely need to pay for your textbooks, save yourself a few hundred dollars by reviewing these sites.

  1. Textbook Revolution: Find biology, business, engineering, mathematics and world history textbooks here.
  2. Wikibooks: From cookbooks to the computing department, find instructional and educational materials here.
  3. KnowThis Free Online Textbooks: Get directed to stats textbooks and more.
  4. Online Medical Textbooks: Find books about plastic surgery, anatomy and more here.
  5. Online Science and Math Textbooks: Access biochemistry, chemistry, aeronautics, medical manuals and other textbooks here.
  6. MIT Open Courseware Supplemental Resources: Find free videos, textbooks and more on the subjects of mechanical engineering, mathematics, chemistry and more.
  7. Flat World Knowledge: This innovative site has created an open college textbooks platform that will launch in January 2009.
  8. Free Business Textbooks: Find free books to go along with accounting, economics and other business classes.
  9. Light and Matter: Here you can access open source physics textbooks.
  10. eMedicine: This project from WebMD is continuously updated and has articles and references on surgery, pediatrics and more.

Read More

Free books… Awesome

(via dendroica)

January 30, 2014
flavorpill:


Her book goes beyond the tale of how she survived rape, physical self-abuse, attempted suicide, and selling her body on Craigslist, after being thrown into the secular world with no moral compass to guide her, to analyze how she overcame her past and was eventually accepted to Harvard. Vincent doesn’t sensationalize what happened to her; she’s more concerned with writing about how she reclaimed what belonged to her all along — freedom, agency, self-sufficiency.

Leah Vincent, Deborah Feldman, and Our Cultural Fascination With Orthodox Jewish Memoirs

flavorpill:

Her book goes beyond the tale of how she survived rape, physical self-abuse, attempted suicide, and selling her body on Craigslist, after being thrown into the secular world with no moral compass to guide her, to analyze how she overcame her past and was eventually accepted to Harvard. Vincent doesn’t sensationalize what happened to her; she’s more concerned with writing about how she reclaimed what belonged to her all along — freedom, agency, self-sufficiency.

Leah Vincent, Deborah Feldman, and Our Cultural Fascination With Orthodox Jewish Memoirs

January 22, 2014
"O dark dark dark. They all go into the dark,
The vacant interstellar spaces, the vacant into the vacant,
The captains, merchant bankers, eminent men of letters,
The generous patrons of art, the statesmen and the rulers,
Distinguished civil servants, chairmen of many committees,
Industrial lords and petty contractors, all go into the dark."

— Extract from East Coker, T.S. Eliot (via csi-middle-earth)

(via dendroica)

December 18, 2013
millionsmillions:

"He is the bastard love-child of John McGahern and JG Ballard" – Kevin Barry on Mike McCormack

millionsmillions:

"He is the bastard love-child of John McGahern and JG Ballard" – Kevin Barry on Mike McCormack

December 4, 2013

oupacademic:

These books will take you from the Ed Sullivan Show where the Beatles first played on American television, to the mystical darkness of the movie theater, to the smoky Harlem clubs where Duke Ellington tickled the ivories. Here are must-reads for that special hepcat or burgeoning cultural critic.  

The Chronicle of Jazz by Mervyn Cooke

Part rich genealogy and part collection of emotional human stories, Cooke offers manifold ways of experiencing a beloved as well as ever evolving art form.

How to Read a Film by James Monaco

An indispensable guide to all of the critical gear one would need to understand and more fully appreciate the inner workings of a movie.

The Republic of Rock by Michael J. Kramer

A penetrating look into how the music amongst American youth cultures in San Francisco and Vietnam during the 1960s bred a generation of politically self-aware citizens. 

Balanchine and the Lost Muse: Revolution & the Making of a Choreographer by Elizabeth Kendall

A portrait of the legendary ballet choreographer as a young man, the political landscape that shaped him, and the friend who haunted the foundations of his innovative career.

How the Beatles Destroyed Rock ‘n’ Roll: An Alternative History of American Popular Music by Elijah Wald

Instead of focusing on the established demi-gods of music history, music historian Elijah Wald shifts the spotlight to the audiences and the working musicians on the cusp of fame, who he argues are more accurate barometers of American society.

Dig: Sound and Music in Hip Culture by Phil Ford

A guided tour through the sonic and the surreptitious world of the mid-century counter-culture movement.

Oxford has a gift for every reader this holiday season. And keep an eye out for more gift guides from Oxford University Press, because books are the best gifts. Can you dig it? 

December 2, 2013
amnhnyc:

Before Agatha Christie became the world’s best-selling mystery writer, toxic compounds were, for a time, part of her everyday life.

For most of the First World War (1914–1918), Christie worked in a hospital as a nurse and later mixing medicines, as she recalled in her autobiography. “It was while I working in the dispensary that I first conceived of writing a detective story,” wrote Christie (1890–1976).
She first learned about “curare,” which is stored in clay pots like this one, as a young woman from a deceptively bland pharmacist…

amnhnyc:

Before Agatha Christie became the world’s best-selling mystery writer, toxic compounds were, for a time, part of her everyday life.

For most of the First World War (1914–1918), Christie worked in a hospital as a nurse and later mixing medicines, as she recalled in her autobiography. “It was while I working in the dispensary that I first conceived of writing a detective story,” wrote Christie (1890–1976).

She first learned about “curare,” which is stored in clay pots like this one, as a young woman from a deceptively bland pharmacist

November 17, 2013
breakingnews:

Nobel author Doris Lessing dies at 94
Nobel prize-winning author Doris Lessing has died at the age of 94, The Guardian reports.
At 88 years old, she became the oldest author to win the Nobel prize in literature. 

Born in Iran, brought up in the African bush in Zimbabwe – where her 1950 first novel, The Grass Is Singing, was set – Lessing had been a London resident for more than half a century. In 2007 she arrived back to West Hampstead, north London, by taxi, carrying heavy bags of shopping, to find the doorstep besieged by reporters and camera crews. “Oh Christ,” she said, on learning that their excitement was because at 88 she had just become the oldest author to win the Nobel prize in literature. Only the 11th woman to win the honour, she had beaten that year’s favourite, the American author Philip Roth.
Pausing rather crossly on her front path, she said “one can get more excited”, and went on to observe that since she had already won all the other prizes in Europe, this was “a royal flush”.
Later she remarked: “I’m 88 years old and they can’t give the Nobel to someone who’s dead, so I think they were probably thinking they’d probably better give it to me now before I’ve popped off.”

Lessing is the author of more than 50 novels ranging from political to science fiction.
Photo: Doris Lessing with her prize insignia of the 2007 Nobel prize in literature. (Shaun Curry/AFP/Getty Images)

breakingnews:

Nobel author Doris Lessing dies at 94

Nobel prize-winning author Doris Lessing has died at the age of 94, The Guardian reports.

At 88 years old, she became the oldest author to win the Nobel prize in literature. 

Born in Iran, brought up in the African bush in Zimbabwe – where her 1950 first novel, The Grass Is Singing, was set – Lessing had been a London resident for more than half a century. In 2007 she arrived back to West Hampstead, north London, by taxi, carrying heavy bags of shopping, to find the doorstep besieged by reporters and camera crews. “Oh Christ,” she said, on learning that their excitement was because at 88 she had just become the oldest author to win the Nobel prize in literature. Only the 11th woman to win the honour, she had beaten that year’s favourite, the American author Philip Roth.

Pausing rather crossly on her front path, she said “one can get more excited”, and went on to observe that since she had already won all the other prizes in Europe, this was “a royal flush”.

Later she remarked: “I’m 88 years old and they can’t give the Nobel to someone who’s dead, so I think they were probably thinking they’d probably better give it to me now before I’ve popped off.”

Lessing is the author of more than 50 novels ranging from political to science fiction.

Photo: Doris Lessing with her prize insignia of the 2007 Nobel prize in literature. (Shaun Curry/AFP/Getty Images)

November 17, 2013
millionsmillions:

Recommended Viewing: Julian Peters illustrated T.S. Eliot’s “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" as a comic.

millionsmillions:

Recommended Viewing: Julian Peters illustrated T.S. Eliot’sThe Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" as a comic.

November 13, 2013
"No adult author writes for praise alone. Surely any serious writer writes because he has an urgent message to impart, one that he hopes will be of some use to the reader. I don’t know the origin of the idea that writers are such delicate creatures, barely able to withstand public scrutiny of their genius, but it seems ever-present."

Maria Bustillos on the value of honest criticism in book reviews: http://nyr.kr/1aD3Fp7

(Source: newyorker.com, via newyorker)

10:55am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Z8bgTy_HSBki
  
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