August 9, 2014

Marco Paoluzzo

Faroe Islands - Winter

August 8, 2014

Wouter van de Voude

Hume Sunrise

July 25, 2014

Kyler Zeleny

Out West

Out West is a visual travelogue documenting rural communities in the Canadian west. Over a hundred communities of between six and 1,000 inhabitants were documented. The project offers a version of the current state of affairs in the Canadian West, exploring how rural spaces experience an urban-rural time lag. The images conjure up a Vonnegut-like idea of being “unstuck in time”, where objects and the built landscape deceive the viewer as to what period they belong too. (artist statement)

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July 18, 2014

Michael Gregory

From Long Way Home

2014

June 30, 2014

Petros Koublis

In Landscapes

An alternate state in parallel time

The area that surrounds Athens is composed by a certain antithesis, as the vast urban surface meets with the countryside. 
Surrounded by the silence of centenarian olive groves, meadows, mountains and seas, the city today struggles to carry the weight of its own existence, facing a rather tough and tense present. This is a prolonged silence that seems to surround the loud and desperate cry that comes out of the capital city.

With more than 4 million people living today in Athens’ metropolitan area, the city itself is a controversial image of its own, sketched by the difficult palpable reality that everyday an increasing number of people have to face. It is a depression that gradually influences every aspect of life, economically and psychologically, in quite a dramatic and absolute way, as the consequences of this crisis are extending and the agony for tomorrow is constantly growing. Around the world, images of graphic violence, extensive riots and distressing poverty have been transmitted by the media, enhancing the depressed portrait of the city. The center of Athens has been the main scenery of the crisis that this country is going through and the drama in the streets of the city provided a visual narrative for the Greek Crisis chronicles.

The images of this project were made around the outskirts of Athens, less than 30 miles away from the heart of the capital. It is the area that surrounds the depressed city and all the millions of its citizens’ individual stories. Outside the invisible borders of the extended metropolitan area, in the land that lies past the edge of the city, time seems to move parallel but in a different density. There is an inevitable contrast between the two states, a parable manifested by the discreet mystery that trees seem to hide among their branches and seas among their waves. This is an alternate state in parallel time, where silence seems to carry inside it a waiting, patiently whispering a long forgotten language. I worked on a series of images that were aiming to express this undefined, mystical presence that wanders around these areas, a lost connection between us and a beauty that regardless of its obvious magnificence it always remains far, strange and unfamiliar, hidden behind an unreasonable mystery. For it’s not only nature, eventually it is beauty itself that has lost its intimate character, overtaken by the values of an artificial illusion that’s reflected through our collapsing cities.

A landscape is an illimitable state. It’s not restricted within the visible area in front of our eyes, but it extends in an undefined distance, reaching for the limits of our interpretation over ourselves and the world around us. It is because every landscape is eventually defined as the vast open field where our thoughts and feelings are meeting with the outside world. It’s both an imaginary field and an actual reality, a perpetual state and a momentary revelation. (artist statement)


There is no beauty that is timeless but the timelessness of nature can reflect a new direction, maybe even a hope. 
It’s not a blissful silence but it’s an inspiring one.

June 30, 2014

Steve McCurry

One Step at a Time

1. Cambodia

2. Yemen

3. Brazil

4. France

5. Ireland

6. Tibet

7. United Kingdom

8. Italy

9. Nepal

10. Bangladesh

Solvitur ambulando
(To solve a problem, walk around)
- St. Jerome

June 24, 2014

Richard John Seymour

Street View

Kenya, like much of the developing world, has not yet been documented by the technologies we take for granted in the West. One such absence is Google Street View. Inspired by the improvised and spontaneous nature of this process of photography, this collection of images is a series of vignettes of Kenyan street life seen from a cars viewpoint on roads from the Maasai Mara to Mombasa via Nairobi taken over the course of 6 weeks in Summer 2013.

June 16, 2014

From 29 Satellie Photos That Will Change Your Perspective On Planet Earth

1. 53.0066°N 7.1920°E. Bourtange is a village with a population of 430 in the municipality of Vlagtwedde in the Netherlands. The star fort was built in 1593 during the Eighty Years’ War when William I of Orange wanted to control the only road between Germany and the city of Groningen. Bourtange was restored to its mid-18th-century state in 1960 and is currently used as an open-air museum.

2. 40°46’56”N; 73°57’55”W. Central Park in New York City spans 843 acres. That’s 6% of the island of Manhattan.

3. 41°23′27″N 2°09′47″E. Barcelona, Spain.

4. 5°26′15″N 12°20′9″E. Venice, Italy

5. 31.079844, -97.80145. In 2013, there were 923,400 home construction projects in the United States. Killeen, Texas.

6. 36.211001, -115.266914. The Desert Shores Community in Las Vegas, Nevada contains 3,351 units and four man-made lakes. Las Vegas, Nevada

7. 25°50′17″N 50°36′18″E. Durrat Al Bahrain will consist of 15 connected, artificial islands (including six atolls, five fish-shaped, and two crescent-shaped). Construction costs are estimated at $6 billion and the project is slated for completion in mid-2015. Bahrain.

8. 5°40′S 52°44′W. Clearcutting operations in the Amazon Rainforest of Para, Brazil branch out from one of the state’s central roads. Pará, Brazil.

9. 32.170890°N 110.855184°W. Tucson, Arizona.

10. 36.78234°N 2.74315°W. Plasticulture refers to the practice of using plastic materials in agricultural applications. This is visible in the plains and valleys of Almeria, Spain where nearly 20,000 hectares are covered by these greenhouse structures. Almeria, Spain

June 10, 2014

Dmitry Rubinshteyn

Deep North

June 8, 2014

Elaine Ling

Baobab: Tree of Generations

A reflection on the dialogue between Man and Nature that starts from the miracle of the Baobab trees that grow in extreme conditions, inspires thoughts on the bond that connects us to the earth. These photographs push the viewer to linger on the power of the universe and the value of reciprocal exchange.

In some of the most arid and infertile regions of Africa, Madagascar, and Australia the Baobab tree grows to enormous size. These miraculous giants are one of the largest living things on the planet and have a potential lifespan of more than a thousand years. They are great friends to their human neighbors—providing an ever-renewing resource for textiles, netting, baskets and roofing. Their nutritious fruit has many medicinal properties.

I am intrigued by the role that these thousand year old giants play in the lives of its human neighbors. It is an enduring presence, perhaps older than the legends passed down from generation to generation, its roots deeply intertwined with daily life. The images in this exhibition reflect both the resilience and transience of life as I partner the Baobab with a person from the community: a grandmother, a grandfather, a young man, a young woman, a mother, a boy child, a girl child. My photographs celebrate an intimate co-existence. These trees were found in South Africa, Mali and Madagascar.