May 4, 2011
Seen+Noted.

Seen+Noted.

April 26, 2011
Dave M. Mitchell. "Fungi from Yuggoth" illustrations.

Dave M. Mitchell. "Fungi from Yuggoth" illustrations.

March 26, 2011
Japanese Anatomical Illustrations. Edo Period (1603-1868). Female dissection, 1800.
These illustrations are from a book by Bunken Kagami (1755-1819) that documents the dissection of a body belonging to a female criminal executed in 1800.

Japanese Anatomical Illustrations. Edo Period (1603-1868). Female dissection, 1800.

These illustrations are from a book by Bunken Kagami (1755-1819) that documents the dissection of a body belonging to a female criminal executed in 1800.

March 26, 2011
Japanese Anatomical Illustrations. Edo Period (1603-1868). Illustration from 1759 edition of Zōzu.
These illustrations are from a 1754 edition of a book entitled Zōzu, which documented the first human dissection in Japan, performed by Tōyō Yamawaki in 1750. Although human dissection had previously been prohibited in Japan, authorities granted Yamawaki permission to cut up the body of an executed criminal in the name of science.
The actual carving was done by a hired assistant, as it was still considered taboo for certain classes of people to handle human remains.

Japanese Anatomical Illustrations. Edo Period (1603-1868). Illustration from 1759 edition of Zōzu.

These illustrations are from a 1754 edition of a book entitled Zōzu, which documented the first human dissection in Japan, performed by Tōyō Yamawaki in 1750. Although human dissection had previously been prohibited in Japan, authorities granted Yamawaki permission to cut up the body of an executed criminal in the name of science.

The actual carving was done by a hired assistant, as it was still considered taboo for certain classes of people to handle human remains.

March 26, 2011
Japanese Anatomical Illustrations. Edo Period (1603-1868). Human skeleton, 1732.
These illustrations — created in 1732 for an article published in 1741 by an ophthalmologist in Kyōto named Toshuku Negoro — show the skeletal remains of two criminals that had been burned at the stake.
This document is thought to have inspired physician Tōyō Yamawaki to conduct Japan’s first recorded human dissection.

Japanese Anatomical Illustrations. Edo Period (1603-1868). Human skeleton, 1732.

These illustrations — created in 1732 for an article published in 1741 by an ophthalmologist in Kyōto named Toshuku Negoro — show the skeletal remains of two criminals that had been burned at the stake.

This document is thought to have inspired physician Tōyō Yamawaki to conduct Japan’s first recorded human dissection.

March 26, 2011
Japanese Anatomical Illustrations. Edo Period (1603-1868). Anatomical illustrations (artist/date unknown).
These anatomical illustrations are based on those found in Pinax Microcosmographicus, a book by German anatomist Johann Remmelin (1583-1632) that entered Japan via the Dutch trading post at Nagasaki.

Japanese Anatomical Illustrations. Edo Period (1603-1868). Anatomical illustrations (artist/date unknown).

These anatomical illustrations are based on those found in Pinax Microcosmographicus, a book by German anatomist Johann Remmelin (1583-1632) that entered Japan via the Dutch trading post at Nagasaki.

March 26, 2011
Japanese Anatomical Illustrations. Edo Period (1603-1868). Anatomical illustrations, late 17th century.
These illustrations are from a late 17th-century document based on the work of Majima Seigan, a 14th-century monk-turned-doctor. According to legend, Seigan had a powerful dream one night that the Buddha would bless him with knowledge to heal eye diseases. The following morning, next to a Buddha statue at the temple, Seigan found a mysterious book packed with medical information. The book allegedly enabled Seigan to become a great eye doctor, and his work contributed greatly to the development of ophthalmology in Japan in the 16th and 17th centuries.

Japanese Anatomical Illustrations. Edo Period (1603-1868). Anatomical illustrations, late 17th century.

These illustrations are from a late 17th-century document based on the work of Majima Seigan, a 14th-century monk-turned-doctor. According to legend, Seigan had a powerful dream one night that the Buddha would bless him with knowledge to heal eye diseases. The following morning, next to a Buddha statue at the temple, Seigan found a mysterious book packed with medical information. The book allegedly enabled Seigan to become a great eye doctor, and his work contributed greatly to the development of ophthalmology in Japan in the 16th and 17th centuries.

March 26, 2011
Japanese Anatomical Illustrations - Edo Period (1603-1868). Anatomical illustrations, late 17th century.
These illustrations are from a late 17th-century document based on the work of Majima Seigan, a 14th-century monk-turned-doctor. According to legend, Seigan had a powerful dream one night that the Buddha would bless him with knowledge to heal eye diseases. The following morning, next to a Buddha statue at the temple, Seigan found a mysterious book packed with medical information. The book allegedly enabled Seigan to become a great eye doctor, and his work contributed greatly to the development of ophthalmology in Japan in the 16th and 17th centuries

Japanese Anatomical Illustrations - Edo Period (1603-1868). Anatomical illustrations, late 17th century.

These illustrations are from a late 17th-century document based on the work of Majima Seigan, a 14th-century monk-turned-doctor. According to legend, Seigan had a powerful dream one night that the Buddha would bless him with knowledge to heal eye diseases. The following morning, next to a Buddha statue at the temple, Seigan found a mysterious book packed with medical information. The book allegedly enabled Seigan to become a great eye doctor, and his work contributed greatly to the development of ophthalmology in Japan in the 16th and 17th centuries

March 26, 2011
Japanese Anatomical Illustrations, Edo Period (1603-1868)  - Pregnancy illustrations, circa 1860.
These pregnancy illustrations are from a copy of Ishinhō, the oldest existing medical book in Japan. Originally written by Yasuyori Tanba in 982 A.D., the 30-volume work describes a variety of diseases and their treatment. Much of the knowledge presented in the book originated from China. The illustrations shown here are from a copy of the book that dates to about 1860.

Japanese Anatomical Illustrations, Edo Period (1603-1868)  - Pregnancy illustrations, circa 1860.

These pregnancy illustrations are from a copy of Ishinhō, the oldest existing medical book in Japan. Originally written by Yasuyori Tanba in 982 A.D., the 30-volume work describes a variety of diseases and their treatment. Much of the knowledge presented in the book originated from China. The illustrations shown here are from a copy of the book that dates to about 1860.

February 3, 2011
Mario Wagner, for ReadyMade Magazine, 2010

Mario Wagner, for ReadyMade Magazine, 2010