July 30, 2014

Jon Tonks

Empire: A Personal History of British Domination

1. The Falkland Islands are home to approximately 600,000 sheep. 

2. German tourists, Gnome Garden, Stanley, Falkland Islands.

3. The Victory was the first pub to have a CD jukebox in Stanley, a feature that arrived in 1991.

4. Edinburgh of the Seven Seas (known locally as “The Settlement”).

5. Opening hours are limited, and supplies are reliant upon ships arriving from Cape Town. 

6. There are seven surnames on the island. These five boys share just two of them. 

7. Pyramid Point. Used by NASA for testing moon buggies in 1971.

8. The First Garrison, Green Mountain.

9. Sunday Best. Lesley Williams and his wife Beatrice attend the Sandy Bay Baptist Chapel Sunday morning service each week.

10. St Helena Day 2013, Jamestown. Each year St Helena Day is marked on May 21, celebrating the day of the island’s discovery.

July 23, 2014

Piri Reis, 1465-1555

Book on Navigation, Late 17th century-early 18th century

Ink and pigments on laid European paper bound between boards covered with red leather with gold.

The Walters Art Museum

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Filed under: piri reis book map 
July 22, 2014

Cuba Then

Cuba Then (Monacelli Press) features some 260 images from the Ramiro A. Fernández Collection of more than 4000 photographs of Cuba dating back to the late 1800s. It is a sequel to I Was Cuba(Chronicle Books), which in 2007 offered a first selection of similar images from Fernández’s in-depth and often intriguing holdings. A New York-based former photo editor for various Time, Inc. magazines (Entertainment WeeklyPeoplePeople en Español) and current contributing photo editor of Americas Quarterly, Fernández emigrated from his native Cuba to Florida with his mother, sister and 22 pieces of luggage when he was eight years old. That was in 1960, shortly after the triumph of Fidel Castro’s dictatorship-crushing political revolution.

1. Annemarie Heinrich, The Lecuona Cuban Boys on tour in Buenos Aires, Argentina (1940-1941), silver print, 8 x 10 inches. This was a popular Cuban orchestra, which toured the world extensively during the 1930s and 1940s. It was founded and promoted by the Cuban composer Ernesto Lecuona (all photographs courtesy The Monacelli Press unless stated otherwise)

2. Photographer unknown, an unidentified Cuban youth takes part in a voluntary security detail outside the Habana Hilton as curious onlookers edge in for a glimpse of Fidel Castro, who had moved into the hotel for a while (January 1959), silver print, 5 x 7 inches.

3. Photographer unknown – World Wide Photos, unidentified performer in a Cuban-operated circus carrying an anaconda (non-indigenous) snake in Camagüey, Cuba (circa 1942), silver print, 8 x 10 inches.

4. Photographer unknown, the actor Alec Guinness in the Old Havana section of the Cuban capital, seen here in a publicity still from the movie, “Our Man in Havana.” The movie was an of the British author Graham Greene’s 1958 novel. This Columbia Pictures motion picture was the last Hollywood-scale production carried out in Havana before relations between the United States and Cuba were severed (1959), silver print, 8 x 10 inches (courtesy of Columbia Pictures)

5. Photographer unknown, Passengers on a municipal bus (known as a “guagua” in Cuban Spanish), Havana (1954), silver print, 8 x 10 inches

6. Panama Pacific Line, Morro Castle, situated at the entrance to Havana Harbor, viewed from the port side under misty conditions (circa 1925), silver print, 8 x 10 inches

7. Photographer unknown, a rain-soaked crowd during a storm on Havana’s gulf-side avenue and promenade, the Malecón, with a view toward the east (circa 1935), silver print, 8 x 10 inches

Cuba Then (2014) is published by The Monacelli Press.

July 21, 2014

Roger Ballen

Die Antwoord

"I Fink U Freeky" was published by Random House Prestel in July 2013.

Website

July 20, 2014

Koto Bolofo

From Skin

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Filed under: koto bolofo art book 
July 16, 2014

A Child Is Born (1965), by Lennart Nilsson

July 16, 2014

Wayne Lawrence

Orchard Beach: The Bronx Riviera

Although New York’s Bronx is considered one of the most diverse communities in America out of which many subcultures originated, such as Hip Hop and Salsa, it’s still viewed as a no man’s land by many of the city’s inhabitants. Perhaps it is a matter of simple geography that many refuse to venture to the northernmost of the city’s five boroughs or, quite possibly, it may be the Borough’s malevolent reputation lingering from its tumultuous past.

From its earliest years, the Bronx has been a hotbed of immigrant working class families, but its image has largely been defined by the urban blight of the late 1960’s through to the 1980’s when arson, drug addiction and social neglect decimated many of its neighborhoods. For the families who have called this scarred landscape home, Orchard Beach, the only beach in the borough, was and remains a treasured respite from the sweltering confines of the concrete jungle. Built in the 1930s by urban planner Robert Moses, the beach carries the stigma as being one of the worst in New York and is commonly known as Horseshit Beach or Chocha Beach.

I began shooting portraits of Orchard Beach’s summertime regulars in 2005 shortly after moving to New York, realizing that the stigma attached to this oasis was largely unjustified - I felt compelled to engage with this community of working class families and colorful characters. The photographs in ‘Orchard Beach – The Bronx Riviera’ celebrate the pride and dignity of the beach’s visitors, working-class people.

Immediately catching the viewer’s eye is the extravagant style of many of the photographs’ subjects – a quest for identity and sense of belonging. Some individuals carry scars and markings that hint to their own personal histories, which often reflect the complex history of the borough itself. Within the gaze of those portrayed we see a community standing in defiance of popular opinion.

The six years I spent photographing Orchard Beach have not only given me the time and space to reflect on the importance of family and community, but also a sense of belonging and purpose. After having experienced the most profound grief when my older brother was brutally murdered, photography has not only offered me an opportunity to give a voice to a community often misunderstood but also a means of healing from the loss experienced.

— Wayne Lawrence / INSTITUTE

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June 29, 2014

What is Your Favorite Thing to Touch? written and illustrated by Myra Tomback Gibson (1965)

June 29, 2014

The Little Fireman - illustrated by Esphyr Slobodkina

The Little Fireman - written by Margaret Wise Brown, illustrated by Esphyr Slobodkina (1975 edition).

June 27, 2014

Max Pam

Supertourist

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