March 13, 2014
unicef:

UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador David Beckham speaks up for the #childrenofsyria and urges you to add your voice to our call to action. 
Watch: http://uni.cf/1iCbF40
Add your voice: http://bit.ly/nolostgeneration

unicef:

UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador David Beckham speaks up for the #childrenofsyria and urges you to add your voice to our call to action. 

Watch: http://uni.cf/1iCbF40

Add your voice: http://bit.ly/nolostgeneration

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Filed under: unicef 
February 14, 2014
unicef:

CAN YOU SEE ME? Adamou (age 10) 
Central African Republic: Adamou Bouba sustained a machete injury when his home was attacked by an armed group. His father and an older brother were killed. To survive, Adamou fled with his mother and 13-year-old brother to the bush, where they remained for several weeks before joining other internally displaced people living in the Bossangoa camp. By mid-January 2014, some 886,000 people across the country remained uprooted by renewed violence.
©UNICEF/Gabrielle Menezes

unicef:

CAN YOU SEE ME? Adamou (age 10) 

Central African Republic: Adamou Bouba sustained a machete injury when his home was attacked by an armed group. His father and an older brother were killed. To survive, Adamou fled with his mother and 13-year-old brother to the bush, where they remained for several weeks before joining other internally displaced people living in the Bossangoa camp. By mid-January 2014, some 886,000 people across the country remained uprooted by renewed violence.

©UNICEF/Gabrielle Menezes

(via united-nations)

January 31, 2014
unicef:

The world made a set of promises to children 25 years ago when it adopted the Convention on the Rights of the Child. Have we kept those promises?
We’re looking at the data to find out – and you can help us. Check out The State of the World’s Children 2014 in Numbers

unicef:

The world made a set of promises to children 25 years ago when it adopted the Convention on the Rights of the Child. Have we kept those promises?

We’re looking at the data to find out – and you can help us. Check out The State of the World’s Children 2014 in Numbers

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Filed under: unicef 
January 16, 2014
unicef:

CAN YOU SEE ME? Emmanual (age 11)
Emmanual [NAME CHANGED], at a UNICEF-supported shelter and reintegration centre for children recently released from armed groups, in Goma, DR Congo. To escape abuse at home, Emmanual joined the militia, where he served as a commander’s bodyguard. He received weapons training, participated in fighting and witnessed the torture and killing of a prisoner. Years later, conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo continues to leave children at risk of forced recruitment.
©UNICEF/Roger LeMoyne
Learn more about UNICEF and the DR Congo HERE

unicef:

CAN YOU SEE ME? Emmanual (age 11)

Emmanual [NAME CHANGED], at a UNICEF-supported shelter and reintegration centre for children recently released from armed groups, in Goma, DR Congo. To escape abuse at home, Emmanual joined the militia, where he served as a commander’s bodyguard. He received weapons training, participated in fighting and witnessed the torture and killing of a prisoner. Years later, conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo continues to leave children at risk of forced recruitment.

©UNICEF/Roger LeMoyne

Learn more about UNICEF and the DR Congo HERE

(via united-nations)

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Filed under: UN UNICEF DRC 
January 9, 2014
unicef:

PHOTO OF THE WEEK - 10 January 2014
Bangladesh: A boy with his mother.
As the world welcomes 2014, a new year draws us closer to the 2015 deadline for achieving the Millennium Development Goals.  As countries rally in common pursuit of the goals – including to reduce child mortality, improve maternal health and realize universal primary education – let us continue to accelerate our progress and embrace fresh opportunities to make a better world for every child, everywhere.
©UNICEF/Naser Siddique

unicef:

PHOTO OF THE WEEK - 10 January 2014

Bangladesh: A boy with his mother.

As the world welcomes 2014, a new year draws us closer to the 2015 deadline for achieving the Millennium Development Goals.  As countries rally in common pursuit of the goals – including to reduce child mortality, improve maternal health and realize universal primary education – let us continue to accelerate our progress and embrace fresh opportunities to make a better world for every child, everywhere.

©UNICEF/Naser Siddique

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Filed under: unicef 
January 2, 2014
united-nations:

More than 2 million children in the Central African Republic (CAR) have been affected by conflict. Many have been injured and killed in attacks, and others separated from their families.

At a UNICEF child-friendly space in Bossangoa in CAR, displaced children start to express their feelings and the distress they’ve experienced through pictures in a drawing session.

Read more at: http://j.mp/1hK1ciR

united-nations:

More than 2 million children in the Central African Republic (CAR) have been affected by conflict. Many have been injured and killed in attacks, and others separated from their families.

At a UNICEF child-friendly space in Bossangoa in CAR, displaced children start to express their feelings and the distress they’ve experienced through pictures in a drawing session.

Read more at: http://j.mp/1hK1ciR

December 16, 2013
unicef:

CAN YOU SEE ME? Ayesha, 26
Bangladesh: When Ayesha Akhter (left) was 13, her uncle asked permission to marry her - a proposal her father denied. In retaliation, her uncle burned her with acid, disfiguring her face and undermining her dream to become a teacher. After undergoing numerous operations, rehabilitation and counselling, she now earns a living making pressure garments for burn victims, through the local NGO Acid Survivors Foundation. Taking a break from work, Ayesha hugs her daughter, 4, in Dhaka.
©UNICEF/Jannatul Mawa
http://www.unicef.org/bangladesh/

unicef:

CAN YOU SEE ME? Ayesha, 26

Bangladesh: When Ayesha Akhter (left) was 13, her uncle asked permission to marry her - a proposal her father denied. In retaliation, her uncle burned her with acid, disfiguring her face and undermining her dream to become a teacher. After undergoing numerous operations, rehabilitation and counselling, she now earns a living making pressure garments for burn victims, through the local NGO Acid Survivors Foundation. Taking a break from work, Ayesha hugs her daughter, 4, in Dhaka.

©UNICEF/Jannatul Mawa

http://www.unicef.org/bangladesh/

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Filed under: Unicef 
December 13, 2013
theatlantic:

229 Million Children Are Officially Invisible

Registering babies at birth may be a routine, almost automated process in the United States, but it’s a rarity in some impoverished nations in both South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa, according to a new report released on Tuesday by UNICEF. In all, there are nearly 230 million children in the world who are nameless and stateless. And they may languish in anonymity for a good portion of their early lives.
Living without any proof of your existence can be a major challenge. The associated paperwork is often necessary to secure healthcare, education, and other basic rights. And children who don’t have identification are also left at higher risk of displacement, exploitation, and human trafficking. In the chaos of war or disaster, reuniting children separated from their family can be difficult, if not impossible, without proper documentation. And with no formal proof of age, marriage, military service, and employment may all become a reality much sooner than appropriate. 
Read more. [Image: Stuart Price/United Nations]

theatlantic:

229 Million Children Are Officially Invisible

Registering babies at birth may be a routine, almost automated process in the United States, but it’s a rarity in some impoverished nations in both South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa, according to a new report released on Tuesday by UNICEF. In all, there are nearly 230 million children in the world who are nameless and stateless. And they may languish in anonymity for a good portion of their early lives.

Living without any proof of your existence can be a major challenge. The associated paperwork is often necessary to secure healthcare, education, and other basic rights. And children who don’t have identification are also left at higher risk of displacement, exploitation, and human trafficking. In the chaos of war or disaster, reuniting children separated from their family can be difficult, if not impossible, without proper documentation. And with no formal proof of age, marriage, military service, and employment may all become a reality much sooner than appropriate.

Read more. [Image: Stuart Price/United Nations]

December 13, 2013

unicef:

A month after Typhoon Haiyan tore through the Philippines, life is slowly returning to normal in hard-hit Tacloban, but as the experiences of these families show, there are tough choices to make, and things will never be quite the same.

Read more here

(via united-nations)

December 5, 2013

unicef:

Typhoon Haiyan survivor Lian, 17, describes narrowly escaping death in Tacloban and shows us the school she’s attended since kindergarten, now flattened. 

Watch - and find out how you can help children in the Philippines: http://uni.cf/189IG2I

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Filed under: unicef