March 18, 2014

Zoological Atlas.

'Atlas de Zoologie : ou Collection de 100 Planches' by Paul Gervais (1844) is a supplementary volume of illustrations, originally produced for a large French series on zoology published between 1816 and 1830. The original series featured 60 written volumes and another 10 or so volumes of illustration plates. The series title:'Dictionnaire des sciences naturelles, dans lequel on traite méthodiquement des différens êtres de la nature, considérés soit en eux-mêmes, d'après l'état actuel de nos connaissances, soit relativement à l'utilité qu'en peuvent retirer la médecine, l'agriculture, le commerce et les artes…'.

March 16, 2014

Onze vogels in huis en tuin / by Keulemans, J. G. (John Gerrard), 1842-1912 

March 16, 2014

19th Century German Cromolitographs

February 20, 2014

Jacob Riis.

Bandits’ Roost, NYC

1. Bandit’s Roost (1888), by Jacob Riis, from “How the Other Half Lives.” Bandit’s Roost, at 59½ Mulberry Street (Mulberry Bend), was the most crime-ridden, dangerous part of all New York City.

2. Mulberry Bend (ca. 1888), photo by Jacob Riis. “Five Points (and Mulberry Street), at one time was a neighborhood for the middle class. But when they had water problems because of an underground spring, the area was abandoned to the poor. It was the first American slum. In 1880 there were 37,000 tenements housing nearly 1.1 million people. Most were one or two room apartments.  There was no running water and the bedrooms often had no windows at all.  The buildings were so close together people could hand things across the alley, window to window. Mulberry Bend was one of the worst stretch of slums and in 1896 it was demolished to be turned into Columbus Park. Chinatown and Little Italy encroached, as did federal buildings to the south.

3. Mullen’s Alley (February 12, 1888), photo by Jacob Riis. “There were thousands of homeless children on the streets (of NYC), often abandoned by their parents… and in the summer months 3-4 babies would suffocate in the airless tenements every night.”

4. ca. 1880-1890, Manhattan’s Lower East Side — Photo by Jacob Riis. “More than 100,000 immigrants lived in rear apartments (behind other buildings) that were wholly unfit for human habitation. In a room not thirteen feet either way slept twelve men and women, two or three in bunks set in a sort of alcove, the rest on the floor. There were also rooms where people could sleep for five cents a night, stranger next to stranger.”

5. ca. 1888–1898 — Dens of Death

6. 1885, Lower East Side, NY — Shelter for immigrants in a Bayard Street tenement, where a group of men share one room. – Photo by Jacob Riis, Image © Bettmann/Corbis

7. ca. 1880s, New York City — Poor family in one room tenement apartment — Photo by Jacob Riis, Image © Bettmann/Corbis

8. 1902, New York City — A classroom full of children in the condemned Essex Market School. A teacher demonstrates on the blackboard, as students watch attentively from crowded pews. Note the open gas jets near the ceiling used for lighting. — Photo by Jacob Riis, Image © Bettmann/Corbis

9. ca. 1890s, New York — Three homeless boys sleep on a stairway in a Lower East Side alley. – Photo by Jacob Riis, Image © Bettmann/Corbis

10. Little Italy, Mulberry Street, New York City by Detroit Publishing, ca. 1900 (Library of Congress)

February 17, 2014
Cornelius Vanderbilt II as Louis XVI, and Mrs. Vanderbilt (Alice Claypoole Gwynne), as “Electric Light” at the Vanderbilt Ball, 1883, photographed by José Maria Mora.Courtesy Museum of the City of New York and Gilded New York (Monacelli Press)

Cornelius Vanderbilt II as Louis XVI, and Mrs. Vanderbilt (Alice Claypoole Gwynne), as “Electric Light” at the Vanderbilt Ball, 1883, photographed by José Maria Mora.
Courtesy Museum of the City of New York and Gilded New York (Monacelli Press)

February 15, 2014
oldbookillustrations:

A dream (Willmott’s English Sacred Poetry, 1862).

Henry Hugh Armstead, from English illustration, ‘the sixties’ : 1857-70, by Gleeson White, London, 1903.

(Source: archive.org)

oldbookillustrations:

A dream (Willmott’s English Sacred Poetry, 1862).

Henry Hugh Armstead, from English illustration, ‘the sixties’ : 1857-70, by Gleeson White, London, 1903.

(Source: archive.org)

February 15, 2014
aleyma:

Fede ring, made in Hungary in the 17th or 19th century (source).

aleyma:

Fede ring, made in Hungary in the 17th or 19th century (source).

February 12, 2014

Illustrations by Fortuné Méaulle for Alphabet des Insectes by Leon Becker 
(France, 1883)

The scans come from the Bibliothèque nationale de France.

A previously-covered Cotsen exhibit says about the book:

Insects stand in for people in this highly fanciful French alphabet. In addition to weight-lifting or parading down the boulevard, they file into church, ice skate, duel, dance, sail, paint, serenade a lover or invite her to dance, and, of course, improve their minds reading.

Hetzel was one of the most important publishers of children’s books in late nineteenth-century France, whose publications were distinguished by their handsome gold-stamped cloth bindings and excellent illustrations.

You can see covers Meaulle (fr.wiki) did for Le Petit Journal here.

January 30, 2014
oldbookillustrations:

At sunset.

Myles Birket Foster, from Pictures of rustic landscape, with passages in prose and verse selected by John Davidson, New York, London, 1895.

(Source: archive.org)

oldbookillustrations:

At sunset.

Myles Birket Foster, from Pictures of rustic landscape, with passages in prose and verse selected by John Davidson, New York, London, 1895.

(Source: archive.org)

January 27, 2014

My Pony: a poemPhiladelphia: Published and sold by Wm. Charles, 1818.