August 29, 2014

Alessandra de Cristofaro

Suicide Pilar

Sticker album by Studio Pilar, dedicated to tattoos.

August 29, 2014
nprfreshair:

Originally Jesse Pinkman was supposed to be killed off Breaking Bad during the show’s first season. Aaron Paul says he didn’t learn that until series creator Vince Gilligan called him over one day during lunch.
"He goes, ‘Originally Jesse was supposed to die at the end of this season,’ … and instantly my heart dropped and slowed down a bit," Paul says. "And he said, ‘We don’t think we’re going to do that anymore.’ "
Gilligan told Paul that he loved the chemistry between Walt and Jesse.
"He decided to change the whole dynamic of their relationship and really the whole dynamic of the show," says Paul. "But the entire second season, the entire third season, I thought that Jesse could be a goner at any moment because there’s many things that this character could screw up on, and he could definitely meet his deathbed at any moment."
Other cast members, including Bryan Cranston, would joke around on set with Paul about his character’s potential demise.
"Bryan would come up and give me a hug and say, ‘I’m not going to say anything but it was such a pleasure working with you. It’s been an amazing past year-and-a-half, and you have a huge career ahead of you,’ " he says. "They would always joke around about it. They’ve kind of slowed down about it, but who knows — this kid could die at any second."
Hear the interview with Aaron Paul 

nprfreshair:

Originally Jesse Pinkman was supposed to be killed off Breaking Bad during the show’s first season. Aaron Paul says he didn’t learn that until series creator Vince Gilligan called him over one day during lunch.

"He goes, ‘Originally Jesse was supposed to die at the end of this season,’ … and instantly my heart dropped and slowed down a bit," Paul says. "And he said, ‘We don’t think we’re going to do that anymore.’ "

Gilligan told Paul that he loved the chemistry between Walt and Jesse.

"He decided to change the whole dynamic of their relationship and really the whole dynamic of the show," says Paul. "But the entire second season, the entire third season, I thought that Jesse could be a goner at any moment because there’s many things that this character could screw up on, and he could definitely meet his deathbed at any moment."

Other cast members, including Bryan Cranston, would joke around on set with Paul about his character’s potential demise.

"Bryan would come up and give me a hug and say, ‘I’m not going to say anything but it was such a pleasure working with you. It’s been an amazing past year-and-a-half, and you have a huge career ahead of you,’ " he says. "They would always joke around about it. They’ve kind of slowed down about it, but who knows — this kid could die at any second."

Hear the interview with Aaron Paul 

(via flavorpill)

August 29, 2014

pixandum:

8.29.14.

"Breathe/ing"

A few people accurately pointed on my post yesterday that i don’t have many shots with people. True. But i was surprised when i looked through my files how many i actually did have.  I thought it might be interesting to put a few together in sets.  Set 1  -sam

August 29, 2014
humanrightswatch:

Things to get excited about:
- It’s Friday, which means,
- … weekend is around the corner, which also means,
- … it’s a long weekend
Happy end of the week, Tumblr. 

humanrightswatch:

Things to get excited about:

- It’s Friday, which means,

- … weekend is around the corner, which also means,

- … it’s a long weekend

Happy end of the week, Tumblr. 

August 29, 2014
moma:

MoMA Film’s World War I series The Great War continues this weekend with screenings of silent films featuring live musical accompaniment. http://bit.ly/1wOc0aG

[What Price Glory. 1952. USA. Directed by John Ford]

moma:

MoMA Film’s World War I series The Great War continues this weekend with screenings of silent films featuring live musical accompaniment. http://bit.ly/1wOc0aG

[What Price Glory. 1952. USA. Directed by John Ford]

August 29, 2014

futurejournalismproject:

The Art of Swimming

The unfortunate, unofficial end of the summer comes to the US this Labor Day Weekend. With that in mind, a visual explainer from 1587.

Via The Public Domain Review:

Illustrations from Everard Digby’s De Arte Natandi (The Art of Swimming) published in 1587, considered the first English treatise on the practice. Divided into two parts, the first is largely theoretical (Digby wrote in Latin, though it would be translated into English by Christopher Middleton eight years later). The second part is concerned with practical demonstration borne out in a series of 40 beautiful woodcuts, all composed from five landscape blocks into which swimmers in various positions have been placed. The work was hugely influential, not just providing a practical guide to staying afloat and different strokes but also in its attention to issues of safety. As the Wellcome Library blog notes: “The work is alive to the dangers of swimming outdoors: Digby makes careful note of the safest methods of entering rivers, warning against jumping in feet first (particularly if the water has a muddy bottom to which your feet would stick) and advocating a slow and patient entry. Swimmers are also advised to have a companion with them, to help if they get into difficulties.

Images: The Art of Swimming, by Everard Digby, via The Public Domain Review. View the complete set on Flickr. Select to embiggen.

August 29, 2014

Marcela Paniak

Elysium

The Elysian Fields were a place in Greek mythology where the souls of heroes and righteous people went to rest. In this land of eternal peace and happiness, the souls were absolved from all suffering. They had infinite time to stroll through the pale meadows, surrounded by music, poplars and asphodels. The last, a type of flower, came to symbolize death, grief, sadness, melancholy, sentimentality — and eternity.

In the words of English poet Alfred Lord Tennyson:

Others in Elysian valleys dwell, 
Resting weary limbs at last on beds of asphodel

— Marcela Paniak

4:38pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Z8bgTy1PVWj8y
  
Filed under: marcela paniak art 
August 29, 2014
sajjadworks:

 manufactured landscapes 1 of 3

sajjadworks:

 manufactured landscapes 1 of 3

August 29, 2014

(Source: kittiezandtittiez, via art-centric)

August 29, 2014
Strange Medieval Books

erikkwakkel:

Blog post devoted to oddly-shaped books from medieval times, including one shaped like a heart.